Nikon D750 vs Canon 5D Mark III: Part 2


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Canon 5D Mark III 

In the end it all comes down to one question: is the Canon 5D Mark III worth $1,000 more than the new Nikon D750?

In my last post on this topic, I compared the specifications and concluded that on paper these cameras are basically the same. In handling, they’re basically the same. So, without actually shooting with them – say when you’re browsing an online camera store or standing at the counter of your local camera shop – you’d have a hard time giving Canon your money when these cameras are so similar.

Does that change when you start shooting with them?

With that question in mind, I set out to shoot these two machines side by side and see whether the Canon can realistically continue to command the premium price.

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Nikon D750 vs Canon 5D Mark III: Part 1

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The new Nikon D750 wasn’t the camera many Nikon fans had hoped for, a true successor to the vaunted Nikon D700. Whereas the D700 was basically a pro camera in a prosumer body, the D750 is a prosumer camera, period. As such, Nikon still hasn’t launched a camera that can follow in the path of the D700. For Nikon fans, the D750 wasn’t really needed.

But for Canon fans jealous of the dynamic range that Sony’s sensors deliver in the Nikon (and Sony A7 series) cameras, the D750 might well be the answer to their dreams. Because if the D750 is close to any other camera in specs, it’s to Canon’s 5D Mark III. The only major difference seems to be the price, with the Canon being about $1,000 more expensive than the Nikon.

That’s why I wrote when the D750 was launched that it wasn’t aimed at Nikon consumers, but at Canon buyers.

Let’s back up a bit.

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Nikon Aiming at Canon’s 5D Mark III with New D750?

Nikon today joined the party of pre-Photokina 2014 product announcements by announcing the long-rumored D750 DSLR, a 20mm f/1.8 lens and a new small flash.

D750

Nikon D750

The D750 will offer:

  • 24.3 megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor
  • the same EXPEED 4 image processor as in the company’s D810 and D4S
  • Wi-Fi
  • a tilting high-resolution LCD
  • 51-point autofocus
  • 6.5 frames per second
  • advanced video comparable to D810
  • ISO range of 100-12,800 (with expansion up to 51,200)
  • a flash sync speed of 1/200.

It’ll cost S2,300. As such, it sits above the D610 with faster operation and a more solid body and below the D810 with 24 megapixels instead of 36mp. It’s a bit faster than the D810, though.

At the same time, it’s lacking some of the features that would have made it the successor to the vaunted D700 DSLR that many had hoped for.

It almost makes you wonder why Nikon bothered to roll out this camera, considering it’s not the action-oriented camera many wanted and just sits a notch above the D610.

Aimed at 5D Mark III?

Looking at the specifications, it looks as if it’s aimed squarely at the Canon 5D Mark III, which almost has similar specs, but is about $1,000 more expensive.

Nikon already lured quite a few Canon users to its D800 series with its high megapixel count and wide dynamic range.

The D610 was not up to par with the 5D Mark III in terms of overall operation, but the D750 appears to be and seems to offer similar functionality, build and sensor size as the Canon, but with the dynamic range Nikon has become known for.

And so Nikon has lowered the price of switching by roughly a $1,000. Of course, we don’t know yet what Canon will announce in the coming days, but the forums are abuzz with a Canon 7D replacement.

That’s all nice and well, but the 7D line is APS-C format and no matter how much Canon improves the dynamic range on the 7D successor, if at all, it will not be the new full-frame camera many Canon users are hoping for, which is in essence a 5D with more dynamic range and more megapixels to compete with the Nikon D810 at the same price point.

Ironically, that 7D might be the action camera that Nikon users were hoping for.

The D750 will be available late this month. Nikon also offers a new battery pack/grip for the D750 with a steep retail price of $400. Unlike in some previous generation Nikon DSLRs, the D750’s frames per second doesn’t seem to increase when the optional battery pack/grip is attached.

AF-S Nikkor 20mm f1/8G ED Lens

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The company also announced a new wide-angle lens. It’s meant for full frame and is Nikon’s first ultra wide-angle lens with an f/1.8 aperture. The lens will be available later this month for $800.

SB-500 Speedlight

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Finally, Nikon is bringing the SB-500 speedlight to market, which is actually a combination of an on-camera strobe and a LED video light.

The complete specifications and pre-order information can be found at B&H (affiliate links):